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Habit: Leaves and young inflorescences, Mt Lesueur, WA  Photo   W.R.Barker

Leaf and young inflorescences.  Photo   W.R.Barker

Leaves and young inflorescences from old wood.  Photo   W.R.Barker

Young flower buds with rust coloured hairs.  Photo   W.R.Barker

Synonymy

Hakea flabellifolia Meisn., Hooker's J. Bot. Kew Gard. Misc. 7: 116 (1855)

T: interior, North of Swan R. between Moore and Murchison R., Western Australia, without date, J.Drummond 6: 196; holo: NY p.p.; iso: ?B, BM, CGE, K, MEL, OXF, P, PERTH.

An image of the NY type specimen of Drummond 196 can be seen on the New York Botanical Garden site.

Description

Several-stemmed shrub, 0.2–1 m tall, lignotuberous. Branchlets and young leaves appressed-sericeous, ferruginous, quickly glabrescent. Leaves flabelliform with shallowly concave margins, 3.8–6.7 cm long, 18–48 mm wide, narrowly cuneate, entire; apex ±truncate, irregularly 5–15-toothed.

Inflorescence umbelliform with 2–6 flowers; rachis obscure; pedicels 2–3 mm long, densely appressed-pubescent, with hairs white or ferruginous or a mixture of both, continuing onto perianth. Perianth 4–5 mm long. Pistil 8–12 mm long; gland a curved flap.

Fruit obliquely broadly ovate, 4.5–5.5 cm long, 3–3.2 cm wide, coarsely rugose, black-pusticulate. Seed obliquely ovate or elliptic, 45–48 mm long; wing encircling seed body.

Distribution and ecology

Occurs in sand heaths in the Jurien Bay to Eneabba area, north of Perth, Western Australia.

To plot an up to date distribution map based on herbarium collections for this species see Australia's Virtual Herbarium. Localities outside the native range may represent cultivated or naturalised records.

Flowering time

Flowers Oct.–Nov. (?buds in Feb. on one collection).

Derivation of name

From flabellum, Latin for fan and folius, Latin for leaf, a reference to the shape of the leaf.

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Relationships

Part of Section Hakea of Bentham (as Euhakea) and characterised by a non-conical pollen presenter, leaves without obvious venation, perianths with or without hairs and fruits with or without horns. Barker et al. (1999) recognised a number of informal morphological groups within the section.

Within this section 6 species were assigned to the informal Ceratophylla group by Barker et al. (1999). The group is close to the Obliqua group, sharing the morphological characteristics of few-flowered inflorescences with pubescent flowers on an obscure rachis, oblique pollen presenters and distinctly woody fruits without horns and usually without beaks and seed in which the wing encircles the seed body or is broadly down one side; the groups differ in the flat leaves of this group compared with the terete leaves of the Obliqua group. 

Members of the group are H. baxteri, H. brownii, H. ceratophylla, H. flabellifolia, H. hookeriana  and H. pandanicarpa, all from south-west WA.  

Representative specimens

Western Australia: 26 km S of Eneabba, 10 Aug. 1979, R.J.Cranfield s.n. (PERTH); 64 km W of Coorow, H.Demarz 3511 (PERTH); near Mt Lesueur, C.A.Gardner 15996 (PERTH); Cockleshell Gully, E.A.Griffin 2428 (PERTH); Jurien Bay, R.D.Royce 7716 (PERTH).

Weblinks

Link to FloraBase treatment of this species for WA.

 

A photograph of this species can be seen on the Australian National Botanic Gardens site.

Further illustrations

A.S.George, Introd. Proteaceae W. Australia 66 (1984);

W.R.Elliot & D.L.Jones, Encycl. Austral. Pl. 5: 206 (1990).

I. Holliday, Hakeas. A Field and Garden Guide 82-3 (2005)

J.A..Young, Hakeas of Western Australia. A Field and Identification Guide 45 (2006)